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Twenty-five of the most exciting new feature films from around the world.

13TH

  • Ava DuVernay
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 100 minutes

Opening Night · World Premiere · Ava DuVernay and special guests in person*

Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing nonfiction film refers to the loophole in the 13th Amendment that allowed for a progression from slavery to the horrors of mass incarceration and the prison industry. The director lays this out with a bracing lucidity that makes for a work of grand historical synthesis and an overwhelming emotional experience. To quote Woodrow Wilson on another movie, it’s like writing history with lightning.

20th Century Women

  • Mike Mills
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 118 minutes

Centerpiece · World Premiere · Mike Mills and Annette Bening in person*

Mike Mills’s warm, funny, texturally and behaviorally rich new comedy, starring the great Annette Bening, creates a moving group portrait of particular people in a particular place (Santa Barbara) at a particular moment in the 20th century (1979), one lovingly attended detail at a time.

The Lost City of Z

  • James Gray
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 35mm*
  • 140 minutes

Closing Night · World Premiere · James Gray, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller, Tom Holland, and Angus Macfadyen in person*

James Gray’s emotionally and visually resplendent epic tells the story of Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), the British military-man-turned-explorer whose search for a lost city in the Amazon grew into an increasingly feverish, decades-long magnificent obsession.

Aquarius

  • Kleber Mendonça Filho
  • 2016
  • Brazil/France
  • 142 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&As with Kleber Mendonça Filho and Sonia Braga

A 65-year-old widow, transcendently played by the great Brazilian actress Sônia Braga, enters into a protracted struggle with a dubious real estate promoter attempting to buy her apartment in this humane, sophisticated drama.

Certain Women

  • Kelly Reichardt
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 107 minutes

Q&A with Kelly Reichardt, Kristen Stewart, Michelle Williams, Laura Dern, and Lily Gladstone*

Adapting short stories by Maile Meloy, Kelly Reichardt constructs a lean triptych of subtly intersecting lives in Montana, starring Laura Dern, Michelle Williams and Kristen Stewart. Shooting on 16mm, Reichardt creates understated, uncannily intimate dramas nestled within a clear-eyed depiction of the modern American West.

Elle

  • Paul Verhoeven
  • 2016
  • France/Germany
  • 131 minutes

Sneak Preview!

Paul Verhoeven’s first feature in a decade—and his first in French—ranks among his most incendiary, improbable concoctions: a wry, almost-screwball comedy of manners about a woman (a brilliant Isabelle Huppert) who responds to a rape by refusing the mantle of victimhood. An NYFF54 selection.

Fire at Sea

  • Gianfranco Rosi
  • 2016
  • Italy/France
  • 108 minutes

Q&As with Gianfranco Rosi*

Gianfranco Rosi’s documentary observes Europe’s migrant crisis from the vantage point of Lampedusa, where hundreds of thousands of refugees have landed in recent decades. Rosi shows the harrowing work of rescue operations but devotes most of the film to the daily rhythms of this Mediterranean island.

Graduation

  • Cristian Mungiu
  • 2016
  • Romania
  • 127 minutes

Q&As with Cristian Mungiu

Parents anxious about their children’s education will appreciate the moral dilemma of a doctor desperate to ensure his daughter’s acceptance at a British university. Like Mungiu’s 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (NYFF ’07), this superbly constructed, brilliantly acted critique of contemporary Romania resonates worldwide.

Hermia and Helena

  • Matías Piñeiro
  • 2016
  • Argentina/USA
  • 87 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&As with Matías Piñeiro*

On an artist residency in New York, where she’s working on a Spanish translation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Camila (Agustina Muñoz) finds herself within a constellation of constantly shifting relationships. The precise gestures and mercurial moods of Matias Piñeiro’s other work are in evidence here, along with an emotional depth that makes this his richest and most mature film.

I, Daniel Blake

  • Ken Loach
  • 2016
  • UK
  • 100 minutes

U.S. Premiere

Ken Loach’s thoroughly shattering film about the English health care system, which won the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, will strike a chord with anyone who has ever tried to negotiate their way through the labyrinth of bureaucracy.

Julieta

  • Pedro Almodóvar
  • 2016
  • Spain
  • 99 minutes

Q&As with Pedro Almodóvar, Adriana Ugarte, and Emma Suarez*

Pedro Almodóvar explores his favorite themes of love, sexuality, guilt, and destiny through the poignant story of Julieta, who has a chance encounter that stirs up sorrowful memories of the daughter who abandoned her.

Manchester by the Sea

  • Kenneth Lonergan
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 137 minutes

Q&A with Kenneth Lonergan, Casey Affleck, Lucas Hedges, and more*

In Kenneth Lonergan’s intimate yet grandly scaled new film, Casey Affleck is the volatile and deeply troubled Lee Chandler, a Boston-based handyman coping with the overwhelming loss of his brother (Kyle Chandler) and the memory of an unspeakable tragedy.

Moonlight

  • Barry Jenkins
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 110 minutes

Q&A with Barry Jenkins on January 5

Barry Jenkins’s this three-part narrative spans the childhood, adolescence, and adulthood of a gay African-American man who survives Miami’s drug-plagued inner city, finding love in unexpected places and the possibility of change within himself. An NYFF54 selection. An A24 release. Preceded by: My Josephine (Barry Jenkins, 8m).

My Entire High School Sinking into the Sea

  • Dash Shaw
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 75 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&As with Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw, known for such celebrated graphic novels as Bottomless Belly Button and New School, brings his subjective, dreamlike sense of narrative; his empathy for outsiders and their desire to connect; and his rich, expressive drawing style to his first animated feature.

Neruda

  • Pablo Larraín
  • 2016
  • Chile/Argentina/France/Spain
  • 107 minutes
  • Opens December 16, 2016

Pablo Larraín’s exciting, surprising, and colorful new film is a “Nerudean” portrait of the great Chilean poet’s years of flight and exile, featuring Luis Gnecco, Gael García Bernal as a fictional detective, and a terrific cast.

Paterson

  • Jim Jarmusch
  • 2016
  • USA
  • 118 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&A with Jim Jarmusch and Adam Driver on 10/2 • Sponsored by The Village Voice

Adam Driver is Paterson, a bus driver who writes poetry and happens to live and work in the city of Paterson, New Jersey, with his effervescent and energetic girlfriend (Golshifteh Farahani). Jim Jarmusch’s exquisite film is set to the rhythm of an individual consciousness and is made under the sign of the great American poet and New Jersey resident William Carlos Williams.

Personal Shopper

  • Olivier Assayas
  • 2016
  • France
  • 105 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&As with Olivier Assayas and Kristen Stewart*

Kristen Stewart is the medium, in more ways than one, for this sophisticated genre exploration from director Olivier Assayas. As a fashion assistant whose twin brother has died, leaving her bereft and longing for messages from the other side, Stewart is fragile and enigmatic—and nearly always on-screen.

The Rehearsal

  • Alison Maclean
  • 2016
  • New Zealand
  • 102 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&As with Alison Maclean and select cast

Alison Maclean (Jesus’ Son) returns to her New Zealand filmmaking roots with a multilayered coming-of-age story about a young actor searching for the truth of a character he’s playing onstage and the resulting moral dilemma in his personal life.

Sieranevada

  • Cristi Puiu
  • 2016
  • Romania
  • 173 minutes

U.S. Premiere

Set largely within a family’s labyrinthine Bucharest apartment during a memorial gathering for a deceased patriarch, Cristi Puiu’s virtuosic chamber drama is a film of partial glimpses and slyly obscured information. As claustrophobia mounts, the heated, humorous exchanges coalesce into a brilliantly staged and observed portrait of personal and social disquiet.

The Son of Joseph

  • Eugène Green
  • 2016
  • France/Belgium
  • 114 minutes
  • Opens January 13, 2017

This nativity story reboot from the American-born expatriate filmmaker Eugène Green might be his most buoyant work to date, featuring newcomer Victor Ezenfis, Mathieu Amalric, Fabrizio Rongione, and Natacha Régnier.

Staying Vertical

  • Alain Guiraudie
  • 2016
  • France
  • 100 minutes
  • Opens January 20, 2017

Combining the formal control of his 2013 breakthrough Stranger by the Lake with the shape-shifting fabulism of his earlier work, Alain Guiraudie’s new film is a sidelong look at the human cycle of birth, procreation, and death, as well as his boldest riff yet on his signature subjects of freedom and desire.

Things to Come

  • Mia Hansen-Løve
  • 2016
  • France/Germany
  • 100 minutes

Q&As with Mia Hansen-Løve and Isabelle Huppert*

The new film from Mia Hansen-Løve (Eden) is an exquisite expression of time’s passing. Isabelle Huppert is Nathalie, a Parisian professor of philosophy who comes to realize that the tectonic plates of her existence are slowly but inexorably shifting. Huppert’s remarkable performance is counterpointed by the quietly accumulating force of the action.

Toni Erdmann

  • Maren Ade
  • 2016
  • Germany
  • 162 minutes

Maren Ade and Sandra Hüller in person*

An audacious twist on the screwball comedy, in which the twosome is an aging-hippie prankster father and his corporate-ladder-climbing daughter, Toni Erdmann delivers art and entertainment in equal measure and charmed just about everyone who saw it at the Cannes Film Festival this year.

The Unknown Girl

  • Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne
  • 2016
  • Belgium
  • 106 minutes

U.S. Premiere • Q&As with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

In Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne’s new film, Adèle Haenel gives an extraordinary performance as a doctor who is spurred by a tragic occurrence to diagnose not just her dispossessed patients’ illnesses but also the greater malady afflicting her community.

Yourself and Yours

  • Hong Sang-soo
  • 2016
  • South Korea
  • 86 minutes
The endlessly prolific Hong Sangsoo continues his exploration of the painful caprices of modern romance with this sophisticated break-up/make-up comedy, in which a painter searches for the girlfriend he just split up with, while she—or perhaps her doppelgänger, or twin—has a series of encounters with strange men.