Main Slate

29 of the most exciting new feature films from around the world.

The Irishman

  • Martin Scorsese
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 209 minutes
This richly textured epic of American crime, a dense, complex story told with astonishing fluidity, stars Joe Pesci as Pennsylvania mob boss Russell Bufalino; Al Pacino as Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa; and Robert De Niro as their right-hand man, Frank Sheeran, each working in the closest harmony imaginable with the film’s incomparable creator, Martin Scorsese.

Marriage Story

  • Noah Baumbach
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 136 minutes
Noah Baumbach’s new film is about the rapid tangling and gradual untangling of impetuosity, resentment, and abiding love between a married couple—played by Adam Driver and Scarlett Johannson—negotiating their divorce and the custody of their son. It’s as harrowing as it is hilarious as it is deeply moving.

Motherless Brooklyn

  • Edward Norton
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 144 minutes
Writer-director-producer Edward Norton has transplanted the main character of Jonathan Lethem’s best-selling novel Motherless Brooklyn from modern Brooklyn into an entirely new, richly woven neo-noir narrative: a multilayered conspiracy that expands to encompass the city’s ever-growing racial divide, set in 1950s New York.

Atlantics

  • Mati Diop
  • 2019
  • France/Senegal/Belgium
  • 105 minutes
  • Subtitled
Winner of the Grand Prix at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Mati Diop’s gripping, hallucinatory Senegal-set drama skirts the line between realism and fantasy, romance and horror, and, in its crystalline empathy, humanity, and political outrage, confirms the arrival of a major talent.

Bacurau

  • Kleber Mendonça Filho, Juliano Dornelles
  • 2019
  • Brazil
  • 130 minutes
  • Subtitled
In this wild shape-shifter, a vibrant, richly diverse backcountry Brazilian town finds its sun-dappled day-to-day disturbed when its inhabitants become the targets of a group of armed mercenaries. Bacurau is a vividly angry power-to-the-people fable like no other.

Beanpole

  • Kantemir Balagov
  • 2019
  • Russia
  • 130 minutes
  • Subtitled
In this richly burnished, occasionally harrowing rendering of the persistent scars of war, two women, Iya and Masha (astonishing newcomers Viktoria Miroshnichenko and Vasilisa Perelygina), attempt to readjust to a haunted post-WWII Leningrad.

Fire Will Come

  • Oliver Laxe
  • 2019
  • Spain/France/Luxembourg
  • 85 minutes
  • Subtitled
The beauties and terrors of nature—human and otherwise—drive the extraordinary, elemental new film from Oliver Laxe, in which the verdant Galician landscape becomes the setting for the powerful story of Amador, who has recently served time in prison for arson and has come home to live with his elderly mother.

First Cow

  • Kelly Reichardt
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 122 minutes
Kelly Reichardt once again trains her perceptive and patient eye on the Pacific Northwest, this time evoking an authentically hardscrabble early 19th-century way of life for this tale of a taciturn loner and skilled cook (John Magaro) who has joined a group of fur trappers in Oregon Territory, but only finds true connection with a Chinese immigrant (Orion Lee) also seeking his fortune.

A Girl Missing

  • Koji Fukada
  • 2019
  • Japan
  • 111 minutes
  • Subtitled
Middle-aged Ichiko—played by the extraordinary Mariko Tsutsui—works as a private nurse in a small town for a family; when one of the girls disappears, Ichiko gets caught up in the resulting media sensation in increasingly surprising and devastating ways. Tsutsui and director Koji Fukada have created one of the most memorable, enigmatic movie protagonists in years.

I Was at Home, But…

  • Angela Schanelec
  • 2019
  • Germany
  • 105 minutes
  • Subtitled
An elliptical yet emotionally lucid variation on the domestic drama, the latest film by German director Angela Schanelec intricately navigates the psychological contours of a Berlin family in crisis.

Liberté

  • Albert Serra
  • 2019
  • France/Portugal/Spain
  • 132 minutes
  • Subtitled
In the 18th century, somewhere deep in a forest clearing, a group of bewigged libertines engage in a series of pansexual games of pain, torture, humiliation, and other dissolute, Sadean pleasures. Catalan filmmaker Albert Serra’s latest is easily his most provocative yet.

Martin Eden

  • Pietro Marcello
  • 2019
  • Italy
  • 129 minutes
  • Subtitled
In this enveloping adaptation of a Jack London novel from Italian filmmaker Pietro Marcello, Martin Eden is a dissatisfied prole with artistic aspirations who hopes that his dreams of becoming a writer will help him rise above his station and marry a wealthy young university student.

The Moneychanger

  • Federico Veiroj
  • 2019
  • Uruguay
  • 97 minutes
  • Subtitled
Leading light of contemporary Uruguayan cinema Federico Veiroj’s new film is his most ambitious, political, and forceful yet, starring Daniel Hendler as Humberto Brause, who takes advantage of Uruguay’s poor economy by specializing in shady offshore investing.

Oh Mercy!

  • Arnaud Desplechin
  • 2019
  • France
  • 119 minutes
  • Subtitled
Arnaud Desplechin shows a different and no less impressive side of his mastery with this taut policier, based on a true murder case in his hometown of Roubaix, where, during a somber Christmas season, a French-Algerian detective is investigating the fatal strangulation of a poor, elderly woman in her apartment, with suspicion falling on her next-door neighbors.

Pain and Glory

  • Pedro Almodóvar
  • 2019
  • Spain
  • 113 minutes
  • Subtitled
Pedro Almodóvar taps into new reservoirs of introspection and emotional warmth with this miraculous, internalized portrayal of Salvador Mallo, a director not too subtly modeled on Almodóvar himself and played by Antonio Banderas, who deservedly won Best Actor at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

Parasite

  • Bong Joon Ho
  • 2019
  • South Korea
  • 131 minutes
  • Subtitled
In Bong Joon Ho’s exhilarating, Palme d’Or–winning film, a threadbare family of four struggling to make ends meet gradually hatches a scheme to work for, and as a result infiltrate, the wealthy household of an entrepreneur, his seemingly frivolous wife, and their troubled kids.

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

  • Céline Sciamma
  • 2019
  • France
  • 121 minutes
  • Subtitled
On the cusp of the 19th century, young painter Marianne travels to a rugged, rocky island off the coast of Brittany to create a wedding portrait of the wealthy yet free-spirited Héloise. An emotional and erotic bond develops between the women in Céline Sciamma’s Cannes-awarded subversion of the story of an artist and “his” muse.

Saturday Fiction

  • Lou Ye
  • 2019
  • China
  • 125 minutes
  • Subtitled
The incomparable Gong Li (Raise the Red Lantern) gives a mesmerizing, take-no-prisoners performance in Saturday Fiction, a slow-burn spy thriller set in Japanese-occupied Shanghai on the cusp of World War II, directed by Lou Ye.

Sibyl

  • Justine Triet
  • 2019
  • France/Belgium
  • 99 minutes
  • Subtitled
In Justine Triet’s intricate, highly entertaining study of the professional and personal masks we wear as we perform our daily lives, a psychotherapist (Virginie Efira) abruptly decides to leave her practice to restart her writing career—only to find herself increasingly embroiled in the life of a desperate new patient (Adèle Exarchopoulos).

Synonyms

  • Nadav Lapid
  • 2019
  • France/Israel/Germany
  • 123 minutes
  • Subtitled
Disillusioned Israeli Yoav (Tom Mercier), who has absconded to Paris following his military training and has disavowed Hebrew, falls into an emotional and intellectual triangle with a wealthy bohemian couple in Nadav Lapid’s powerful film about language and physicality, masculinity and nationhood.

To the Ends of the Earth

  • Kiyoshi Kurosawa
  • 2019
  • Japan
  • 120 minutes
  • Subtitled
Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s penetrating depiction of the alienation and anxiety experienced by a young reality TV host—played by former J-pop idol Atsuko Maeda—while traveling for work in Uzbekistan pushes the director’s craft into new, mysterious, and enormously emotional realms.

The Traitor

  • Marco Bellocchio
  • 2019
  • Italy
  • 145 minutes
  • Subtitled
In Marco Bellocchio’s compelling, decades-spanning drama, Pierfrancesco Favino commands the screen as real-life figure Tommaso Buscetta, the mafia boss turned informant who helped take down a large swath of organized crime leaders in Sicily in the eighties.

Varda by Agnès

  • Agnès Varda
  • 2019
  • France
  • 120 minutes
  • Subtitled
In her final work, partially constructed of onstage interviews and lectures, interspersed with a wealth of clips and archival footage, Agnès Varda guides us through her career, from her movies to her remarkable still photography to the delightful and creative installation work.

Vitalina Varela

  • Pedro Costa
  • 2019
  • Portugal
  • 124 minutes
  • Subtitled
Pedro Costa’s latest, a film of deeply concentrated beauty, stars nonprofessional actor Vitalina Varela in a truly remarkable performance, reprising and expanding upon her haunted supporting role from Costa’s Horse Money. She plays a Cape Verdean woman who has come to Fontainhas for her husband’s funeral after being separated from him for decades.

Wasp Network

  • Olivier Assayas
  • 2019
  • France/Spain/Brazil
  • 130 minutes
  • Subtitled
In the early nineties, a small group of Cuban defectors in Miami established a spy web to infiltrate anti-Castroist terrorist groups carrying out violent attacks on Cuban soil. Olivier Assayas brings his customary style and urgency to this unexpected subject in an epic saga starring Penélope Cruz, Édgar Ramírez, and Gael García Bernal.

The Whistlers

  • Corneliu Porumboiu
  • 2019
  • Romania
  • 97 minutes
  • Subtitled
Leading Romanian director Corneliu Porumboiu has made his first all-out genre film—a playful, swift, and elegant neo-noir about an easily corruptible Bucharest police detective who must learn a clandestine, tribal language, improbably made entirely out of whistling.

The Wild Goose Lake

  • Diao Yinan
  • 2019
  • China/France
  • 113 minutes
  • Subtitled
Small-time mob boss Zhou Zenong (the charismatic Hu Ge) is desperate to stay alive after he mistakenly kills a cop and a dead-or-alive reward is put on his head. Chinese director Diao Yinan deftly keeps multiple characters and chronologies spinning, all the while creating an atmosphere thick with eroticism and danger.

Young Ahmed

  • Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne
  • 2019
  • Belgium
  • 84 minutes
  • Subtitled
The Dardenne Brothers won this year’s Best Director award at the Cannes Film Festival for this brave new work, another intimate portrayal-in-furious-motion, about a Muslim teenager in a small Belgian town who is gradually being radicalized into extremism.

Zombi Child

  • Bertrand Bonello
  • 2019
  • France
  • 103 minutes
  • Subtitled
Bertrand Bonello injects urgency and history into the well-worn walking-dead genre with this unconventional plunge into horror-fantasy, moving fluidly between 1962 Haiti, where a young man known as Clairvius Narcisse is made into a zombie by his resentful brother, and a contemporary Paris girls’ boarding school attended by Clairvius’s direct descendant.

Spotlight on Documentary

This year’s series of dispatches from the front lines of nonfiction cinema features incisive portraits of iconic figures, intimate reports from inside the American prison system, New York stories both personal and political, and much more.

45 Seconds of Laughter

  • Tim Robbins
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 95 minutes
In his contemplative, pared down, and wildly engaging documentary, Tim Robbins captures a series of extraordinary sessions in which a group of inmates at the Calipatria State maximum-security facility take part in acting exercises that enhance bonding and emotional connection.

63 Up

  • Michael Apted
  • 2019
  • UK
  • 138 minutes
Michael Apted’s one-of-a-kind British film series returns once again to the lives of Tony; Nicholas; Suzy; Symon and Paul; Jackie, Sue, and Lynn; Andrew and John; Neil and Peter; and Bruce, more introspective than ever at age 63.

Bitter Bread

  • Abbas Fahdel
  • 2019
  • Lebanon/Iraq/France
  • 87 minutes
  • Subtitled
In this patient, heart-rending portrait of Syrian citizens who have fled their country, Iraqi-born filmmaker Abbas Fahdel, director of the epic Homeland (Iraq Year Zero), settles in with a community of refugees living in a tent camp in Lebanon’s Beqaa Valley.

The Booksellers

  • D.W. Young
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 99 minutes
D.W. Young’s elegant and entertaining documentary is a lively tour of New York’s book world, past and present, from the Park Avenue Armory’s annual Antiquarian Book Fair; to the Strand and Argosy book stores, still standing against all odds; to the beautifully crammed apartments of collectors and buyers.

Born to Be

  • Tania Cypriano
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 92 minutes
This remarkable documentary captures the emotional and physical journey of surgical transitioning, as experienced by patients at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital under the guidance of groundbreaking surgeon Dr. Jess Ting.

Bully. Coward. Victim. The Story of Roy Cohn

  • Ivy Meeropol
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 94 minutes
This thorough and mesmerizing documentary takes an appropriately unflinching look at the life and death of Roy Cohn, the closeted, conservative American lawyer whose first job out of law school was prosecuting filmmaker Ivy Meeropol’s grandparents, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg.

College Behind Bars

  • Lynn Novick
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 222 minutes
Veteran filmmaker Lynn Novick’s intimate documentary event is a four-part chronicle of a handful of ambitious and inspiring incarcerated students as they work towards their college diplomas in the Bard Prison Initiative.

Cunningham

  • Alla Kovgan
  • 2019
  • Germany/France/USA
  • 93 minutes
This painstakingly constructed new documentary charts the artistic evolution of choreographer Merce Cunningham and immerses the viewer in the precise rhythms and dynamic movements of his work through a 3D process that allows us to step inside the dance.

Free Time

  • Manfred Kirchheimer
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 61 minutes
Manny Kirchheimer has meticulously restored and constructed 16mm black-and-white footage that he and Walter Hess shot in New York between 1958 and 1960, creating a lustrous evocation of a different rhythm of life. Preceded by Suite No. 1, Prelude, Nicholas Ma’s short, loving portrait of his legendary father, Yo-Yo Ma, recording Bach’s Cello Suites.

My Father and Me

  • Nick Broomfield
  • 2019
  • UK
  • 97 minutes
Documentarian Nick Broomfield has never made a movie more distinctly personal than this complex and moving film about his relationship with his humanist-pacifist father, Maurice Broomfield, a factory worker turned photographer.

Oliver Sacks: His Own Life

  • Ric Burns
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 110 minutes
In Ric Burns’s invigorating documentary, we get to know Oliver Sacks, from his childhood with a schizophrenic older brother, to his years as a champion bodybuilder and motorcycle aficionado, to his remarkable accomplishments as one of our foremost neurologists.

Santiago, Italia

  • Nanni Moretti
  • 2019
  • Italy
  • 80 minutes
  • Subtitled
Nanni Moretti (Caro Diario, Ecce Bombo) tells a story many viewers may not know about: the efforts of the Italian Embassy to save and relocate citizens targeted by the fascist Pinochet regime in Chile.

State Funeral

  • Sergei Loznitsa
  • 2019
  • Netherlands/Lithuania
  • 132 minutes
  • Subtitled
Sergei Loznitsa has uncovered a wealth of astonishing, mostly unseen archival footage of the “Great Farewell” in the days following the death of Joseph Stalin in March 1953 to create an ever-relevant meditation on horrors and absurdity of totalitarianism.

Special Events

American Trial: The Eric Garner Story

  • Roee Messinger
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 100 minutes
This one-of-a-kind hybrid fiction-documentary, which will screen free to the public, engages the services of two actual legal teams to create a rigorous, legally based fictional—yet unscripted—trial that never happened for one of the nation’s most disturbing recent tragedies.

The Cotton Club Encore

  • Francis Ford Coppola
  • 1984
  • USA
  • 139 minutes
Coppola recovered lost negatives to bring The Cotton Club, his sophisticated, witty, and wildly ambitious evocation of thirties genre cinema, back to its original length and luster, with restored sound and image.

Joker

  • Todd Phillips
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 122 minutes
The Joker has gone through many transformations and iterations, but his origin story has never been as vividly or shockingly imagined and realized as it is here. Join us for a special screening and discussion with the creative team behind this truly disturbing vision, led by director Todd Phillips and Joaquin Phoenix.

Screenwriting Master Class with Olivier Assayas

  • 60 minutes
In this special discussion, Assayas will talk about the process of turning real events into creative fictions. Starring Penélope Cruz and Édgar Ramirez, Wasp Network is based on Fernando Morais’s meticulously researched 2015 book The Last Soldiers of the Cold War.

Projections

Projections presents an international selection of film and video work that expands upon our notions of what the moving image can do and be. Drawing on a broad range of innovative modes and techniques, including experimental narratives, avant-garde poetics, crossovers into documentary realms, and contemporary art practices, Projections brings together a diverse offering of short, medium, and feature-length work by some of today’s most essential and groundbreaking filmmakers and artists.

See everything at Projections with an All-Access Pass.

Projections is curated by Dennis Lim (FLC Director of Programming) and Aily Nash (independent curator). Shelby Shaw and Dan Sullivan are Program Assistants. Projections is presented with support from MUBI.

Endless Night

  • Eloy Enciso Cachafeiro
  • 2019
  • Spain
  • 89 minutes
  • Subtitled
A mysterious, soft-spoken man returns to his hometown in the Galician countryside, where he is confronted with a series of moral and existential quandaries that bring his past transgressions to bear on a community crippled by poverty and political injustice.

Un Film dramatique

  • Éric Baudelaire
  • 2019
  • France
  • 114 minutes
  • Subtitled
Shot over a period of four years, Un Film dramatique follows the creative intuitions of 20 Parisian middle-schoolers as they experiment with cameras on their own terms, theoretically reflect on the medium, and debate issues of ethnicity, discrimination, and representations of power and identity.

Heimat Is a Space in Time

  • Thomas Heise
  • 2019
  • Germany/Austria
  • 218 minutes
  • Subtitled
Shot in monochrome black-and-white, Thomas Heise’s monumental essay film combines a wealth of archival footage and materials to reflect on the fraught evolution of Germany’s national identity through the prism of one family’s history.

Trouble

  • Mariah Garnett
  • 2019
  • USA/UK
  • 82 minutes
  • Subtitled
Mariah Garnett’s intimate and inventive biographical portrait of her artist father recounts in his own words his past as a political activist in Belfast and his daughter’s unlikely influence on his life via a combination of letters, interviews, archival footage, and uncanny reenactments of the period.

The Tree House

  • Minh Quý Trương
  • 2019
  • Vietnam
  • 84 minutes
  • Subtitled
In Minh Quý Trương’s striking second feature, combining elements of science fiction and ethnography, a man living on Mars in the year 2045 examines footage brought back from his encounters with an indigenous community in the jungles of Vietnam.

Who Is Afraid of Ideology? + Mum’s Cards

  • Marwa Arsanios
  • 2019
  • Lebanon
  • 51 minutes
  • Subtitled
This stimulating, bifurcated film, shot among the mountains of Kurdistan, a village for women in northern Syria, and a farming community in Lebanon’s Beqaa Valley, tracks the influence of the Kurdish Women’s Liberation Movement. Preceded by Luke Fowler’s intimate portrait of his mother’s work as a sociologist in Glasgow.

Appearances and Disappearances: In Memory of Jonathan Schwartz

  • Jonathan Schwartz
  • 66 minutes
This program of seven, poetic 16mm films made over 15 years combine cutout collage, lyrical camerawork, and elliptical editing to explore childhood, the transience of seasons, and our shared mortality.

Shorts Program 1: News From Home

  • 2019
  • USA/UK
  • 75 minutes
Featuring Miko Revereza's Distancing, Dani and Sheilah ReStack's Come Coyote, Peggy Ahwesh's Kansas Atlas, and Charlotte Prodger's SaF05.

Shorts Program 2: Making Contact

  • 2019
  • 65 minutes
Featuring Gabino Rodríguez and Nicolás Pereda's My Skin, Luminous and Pedro Neves Marques's The Bite.

Shorts Program 3: Signs of Life

  • 2019
  • 70 minutes
Featuring Patrick Staff's The Prince of Homburg, Diane Nguyen's Tyrant Star, Zachary Epcar's Billy, and Beatrice Gibson's Two Sisters Who Are Not Sisters.

Shorts Program 4: Beginnings and Endings

  • 2019
  • 76 minutes
Featuring Luise Donschen's Entire Days Together, Ryan Ferko's Hrvoji, Look at You From the Tower, Luke Fowler's Houses (for Margaret), and George Clark's Double Ghosts.

Shorts Program 5: On the Move

  • 2019
  • 75 minutes
Featuring Kevin Jerome Everson and Claudrena N. Harold's Black Bus Stop, Tomonari Nishikawa's Amusement Ride, Joshua Gen Solondz's (tourism studies), Simon Liu's Signal 8, Akosua Adoma Owusu's Pelourinho: They Don’t Really Care About Us, and Ben Russell's COLOR-BLIND.

Shorts Program 6: Solve for X

  • 2019
  • 79 minutes
Featuring Frances Scott's PHX [X is for Xylonite], Jenny Brady's Receiver, Pat O’Neill's Saugus Series, and James N. Kienitz Wilkins's This Action Lies.

Free Amphitheater Loops

A Topography of Memory

  • Burak Çevik
  • 2019
  • Turkey/Canada
  • 30 minutes
This subtly expansive new work by Burak Çevik (Belonging, ND/NF 2019) combines CCTV footage of urban Istanbul with audio of a family heading to vote in the controversial June 2015 Turkish general election.

Culture Capture: Terminal Adddition

  • Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, Jackson Polys
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 7 minutes
The latest video by the public secret society known as the New Red Order is an incendiary indictment of the norms of European settler colonialism.

Revivals

The Revivals section showcases important works from renowned filmmakers that have been digitally remastered, restored, and preserved with the assistance of generous partners.

L’age d’or

  • Luis Buñuel
  • 1930
  • France
  • 63 minutes
  • Subtitled
Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí followed up their seminal first collaboration, the short Un chien andalou, with this equally bold, acridly funny picture of the hypocrisies of modern bourgeois life, brought back in an amazing new restoration.

Dodsworth

  • William Wyler
  • 1936
  • USA
  • 101 minutes
This worldly, richly layered adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’s 1929 novel, starring Walter Huston and Ruth Chatterton as a wealthy American couple whose marriage is on the rocks during a trip to Europe, is one of the triumphs of the storied career of director William Wyler.

The Incredible Shrinking Man

  • Jack Arnold
  • 1957
  • USA
  • 81 minutes
A dangerous combination of radiation and insecticide causes the unfortunate Scott Carey (Grant Williams) to shrink, slowly but surely, until he is only a few inches tall in this cornerstone of the sci-fi B-movie boom of the American fifties.

Jazz on a Summer’s Day

  • Bert Stern
  • 1959
  • USA
  • 85 minutes
One of the most extraordinary concert films ever made, Brooklyn-born fashion photographer Bert Stern’s glistening, full-color document of the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island is as intimate and gorgeous a depiction of a live music event as one could hope to see.

Le franc + The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun

  • Djibril Diop Mambéty
  • 1999/1994
  • Senegal
  • 91 minutes
  • Subtitled
The great Senegalese director Djibril Diop Mambéty made two wonderful medium-length films in the nineties, magical realist works grounded in the political realities of Dakar.

Los Olvidados

  • Luis Buñuel
  • 1950
  • Mexico
  • 80 minutes
  • Subtitled
Luis Buñuel’s Los Olvidados remains one of the world’s most influential films in its unsentimental yet vivid, sometimes surreal depiction of impoverished youths in Mexico City.

Le Professeur

  • Valerio Zurlini
  • 1972
  • Italy/France
  • 132 minutes
  • Subtitled
Alain Delon stars as a tragically hip poetry and literature professor who travels to Rimini for a four-month teaching assignment with his suicidal wife (Lea Massari), and starts an ill-fated affair with one of his students. Valerio Zurlini’s penetrating character study has been restored to its full length, with 45 minutes added back in after cuts made upon release.

Sátántangó

  • Béla Tarr
  • 1994
  • Hungary/Germany/Switzerland
  • 439 minutes
  • Subtitled
Among the world’s most respected and transformative filmmakers, Béla Tarr made his international breakthrough with this astonishing, seven-and-a-half hour adaptation of the novel by László Krasznahorkai about the arrival of a false prophet in a small farming collective during the waning days of Communism.

Three Short Films by Sergei Parajanov

  • Sergei Parajanov
  • 1966-86
  • Soviet Union
  • 80 minutes
  • Subtitled
This program brings together three remarkable short works by radical Armenian-Georgian filmmaker and artist Sergei Parajanov—meditations on the nature of art and artists that boast his singular, colorful, collage-like style—and Iranian director Forough Farrokhzad’s The House Is Black, a compassionate, poetic depiction of people living in a leper colony in Northern Iran.

Ten Documentary Shorts by Vittorio De Seta

  • Vittorio De Seta
  • 1954-59
  • Italy
  • 119 minutes
  • Subtitled
These vivid, colorful, narration-free nonfiction works, shot in locations around Sicily, Sardinia, and Calabria, alight on the daily labors and traditional customs of rural workers and their families, bringing out their rituals with such focused determination that they become almost dreamlike.

Retrospective

Since its founding in 1919, the American Society of Cinematographers has served as an integral presence within the film industry. The organization’s membership has included many of the cinematographers whose technical innovations and artistic contributions have defined what we think of as the visual language of American cinema. But the ASC has also been a vital community in which its members can exchange ideas and techniques, effectively shaping the history of cinema and its formal elements: composition, blocking, lighting, angles, camera movement, etc. On the occasion of the ASC’s centennial, the New York Film Festival pays tribute to the society with a selection of historically significant and brilliantly photographed films shot by some of its most notable members past and present.

Acknowledgments: Denis Lenoir; Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; UCLA Film & Television Archive

America, America

  • Elia Kazan
  • 1963
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 174 minutes
Haskell Wexler’s sumptuous and kinetic black-and-white handheld cinematography suffuses America, America with a spontaneous energy, greatly enhancing Elia Kazan’s turn-of-the-20th-century portrayal of an immigrant’s journey to a better life.

Dave Chapelle’s Block Party

  • Michel Gondry
  • 2005
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 103 minutes
Michel Gondry’s 2005 documentary of a free daylong performance in Brooklyn hosted by comedian Dave Chapelle abounds with life, energy, and rhythm—thanks in no small part to DP Ellen Kuras’s nimble camera, which captures the all-star concert as a kaleidoscopic, reverberant event.

Days of Heaven

  • Terrence Malick
  • 1978
  • USA
  • 94 minutes
Néstor Almendros’s first Hollywood film was Terrence Malick’s anticipated follow-up to his debut, Badlands. Hired by Malick for his sure hand with natural lighting, Almendros ravishingly draws out and amplifies the inherent beauty and poetry of Malick’s 1916-set story.

Dead Man

  • Jim Jarmusch
  • 1995
  • USA
  • 129 minutes
Jim Jarmusch’s hypnotic, parable-like, revisionist Western doubles as a barbed reflection on America’s treatment of its indigenous people and a radical twist on the myths of the American West, expressed in no small part by Robby Müller’s striking black-and-white cinematography.

The Godfather: Part II

  • Francis Ford Coppola
  • 1974
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 212 minutes
Francis Ford Coppola and Gordon Willis enjoyed one of the 1970s’ most defining cinematographic partnerships, and their most astonishing collaboration was the second installment of Coppola’s adaptation of Mario Puzo’s best-selling novel, lent unsurpassed dimension and atmosphere by Willis’s masterful compositions and lighting.

The Grapes of Wrath

  • John Ford
  • 1940
  • USA
  • 129 minutes
Though Gregg Toland is perhaps best known for his work on such films as Citizen Kane and The Best Years of Our Lives, his camerawork in John Ford’s adaptation of John Steinbeck’s classic novel rates among the influential cinematographer’s greatest achievements.

The Hard Way

  • Vincent Sherman
  • 1943
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 109 minutes
The pioneering Chinese-American cinematographer James Wong Howe shot more than 130 films during his distinguished career—perhaps none as engrossing and entertaining as Vincent Sherman’s 1943 genre-melding musical melodrama.

He Walked by Night

  • Alfred L. Werker
  • 1948
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 79 minutes
Alfred Werker’s pseudo-documentary noir, a lean, mean thriller concerning a petty thief (Richard Basehart) who kills a cop and roams Los Angeles, represents one of cinematographer John Alton’s crowning achievements, an endless, anxious maze of urban shadows.

Leave Her to Heaven

  • John M. Stahl
  • 1945
  • USA
  • 110 minutes
Leon Shamroy’s Oscar-winning work on Leave Her to Heaven marks a historically inspired attempt at a kind-of squaring of the circle: shooting a gripping noir—with Gene Tierney as a murderously selfish femme fatale—in vibrantly beautiful Technicolor.

McCabe & Mrs. Miller

  • Robert Altman
  • 1971
  • USA
  • 121 minutes
Robert Altman’s revisionist western, with Warren Beatty as fur-clad gambler John McCabe, who blows into a snowy town in Washington and sets up a brothel, is defined by Vilmos Zsigmond’s fleet camerawork, which masterfully captures Altman’s characters amid snow-covered landscapes and in candlelit back rooms.

The Passion of Anna

  • Ingmar Bergman
  • 1969
  • USA
  • 100 minutes
  • Subtitled
Filmed by Sven Nykvist on Fårö, Ingmar Bergman’s bleak island home, The Passion of Anna is the case history of a contemporary Everyman, one Andreas Winkelmann (Max von Sydow), a lost soul ricocheting emotionally among a trio of equally damaged folk.

Soldier Girls

  • Nick Broomfield, Joan Churchill
  • 1981
  • USA/UK
  • 87 minutes
Following a platoon of female cadets through basic training at Georgia’s Fort Gordon, Nick Broomfield and Joan Churchill’s 1981 documentary endures as a comical and often critical look at the military industrial complex. Churchill’s dual role as cinematographer and director intensifies her already complicated relationship to the subject.

Street Angel

  • Frank Borzage
  • 1928
  • USA
  • 102 minutes
Brilliantly shot by Ernest Palmer and Paul Ivano, Street Angel has endured as one of Borzage’s most transporting and affecting weepies, about a young woman (Janet Gaynor in an Oscar-winning role) forced into a life of crime by her ailing mother’s escalating medical costs.

Talks

On Cinema

On Cinema: Martin Scorsese

  • 60 minutes
Kent Jones will talk with Martin Scorsese, whose epic crime drama The Irishman is this year’s highly anticipated opening event. Scorsese, known as much for his work as a film historian as for his unparalleled, decades-spanning cinematic career, will guide the audience through a selection of films that inspired this remarkable new work.

On Cinema: Pedro Almodóvar

  • 60 minutes
Kent Jones will talk with Pedro Almodóvar, who has shown films at NYFF eleven times over the past four decades. This year’s selection is perhaps his most personal film yet: Pain and Glory, starring a Cannes Film Festival–awarded Antonio Banderas in the role of a director—essentially a surrogate Almodóvar figure—who has reached a creative block.

Directors Dialogues

The Directors Dialogues are NYFF’s annual series of intimate conversations, in which a selection of filmmakers from this year’s festival sit down for special Q&As to discuss the ideas and the craft behind their buzzed about newest works.

Directors Dialogues: Bong Joon Ho

  • 60 minutes
Bong Joon Ho will discuss Parasite, his spring-trap-loaded comedy-drama-thriller with a social conscience—so make sure you see it first to not spoil its many surprises.

Directors Dialogues: Mati Diop

  • 60 minutes
The French-Senegalese director made perhaps the year’s most talked-about debut feature with Atlantics, which earned her the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival. Both ghost and love story, the film feels unlike any other, hypnotic and supernatural yet grounded in the realities of life as it’s experienced by those living in contemporary, working-class Dakar. Diop will be on hand to discuss how she negotiated these registers and how she constructed her singular film.

Shorts

This year’s four Shorts programs feature a mix of narrative and documentary films from established and emerging artists, with 10 world premieres.

NYFF57 Shorts Program 1: International

  • 2019
  • 90 minutes
A mixture of narrative and documentary, this program showcases bold, new films by emerging and established filmmakers working in international cinema today.

NYFF57 Shorts Program 2: Documentary

  • 2019
  • 64 minutes
This documentary program connects the imperfections of the human experience to the influence of technology and mass media by pairing Pia Borg’s chilling account of the Satanic Ritual Abuse Panic of the 1980s with Theo Anthony’s wry, imaginative essay film about the instant replay system of professional tennis. 

NYFF57 Shorts Program 3: Narrative

  • 2019
  • 96 minutes
From absurdist thrillers and political fantasies to lo-fi sci-fi and body horror, these seven shorts from emerging and established international filmmakers make up this wildly eclectic narrative program.

NYFF57 Shorts Program 4: New York Stories

  • 2019
  • 98 minutes
This program, now in its fifth year, showcases work from some of the most exciting filmmakers living and working in New York today, including established names and ones to watch. 

Convergence

The eighth edition of the annual program delves into innovative modes of storytelling via interactive experiences, featuring Virtual Reality, Immersive Cinema, game play, and more.

Virtual Cinema: Program One

  • Nicholas de Pencier, Jennifer Baichwal, Edward Burtynsky
  • 2019
  • Canada
  • 21 minutes
This three-film program explores the ways that our species has left indelible marks on the planet through hunting, the continuous creation of waste, and the use of Earth’s natural materials in our homes.

Virtual Cinema: Program Two

  • 43 minutes
Featuring Maria Belen Poncio's Metro Viente, Ryan Schmal Murray's Eyelydian, Lucas Gath and Shannon Service's Ghost Fleet, and Lonelyleap's Send Me Home.

Virtual Cinema: Program Three

  • 36 minutes
Featuring John Hsu's Your Spiritual Temple Sucks, Lena Herzog's Last Whispers, Jonathan Glancy's Homeless: A Los Angeles Story, and Ryan Schmal Murray's Eyelydian.

Holy Night

  • Casey Stein, Bernard Zeiger
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 11 minutes
In this interactive experience, the audience pivots between the perspectives of a small-town pastor, a grandmother, and a teenage girl dealing with their complex relationships to community and prescription drugs.

The Raven

  • Lance Weiler, Ava Lee Scott, Nick Fortugno, Nick Childs
  • 2019
  • USA
  • 120 minutes
Edgar Allan Poe’s legacy, his ghosts, and even the mysterious circumstances of his death are examined in this interactive experience that blends immersive theater, elements of game play, cutting-edge audio technology, and first-rate storytelling.