Main Slate

30 of the most exciting new feature films from around the world.

The Favourite

  • Yorgos Lanthimos
  • 2018
  • Ireland/UK/USA
  • 121 minutes
The Duchess of Marlborough (Rachel Weisz), and her servant (Emma Stone) engage in a sexually charged fight to the death for the body and soul of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) at the height of the War of the Spanish Succession in Yorgos Lanthimos’s wildly intricate and very darkly funny new film.

ROMA

  • Alfonso Cuarón
  • 2018
  • Mexico
  • 135 minutes
In Mexico City in the early ’70s, a middle-class family’s center is quietly and unassumingly held by its beloved live-in nanny and housekeeper (Yalitza Aparicio). Alfonso Cuarón tells an epic, autobiographical story of everyday life while also gently sweeping us into a vast cinematic experience.

At Eternity’s Gate

  • Julian Schnabel
  • 2018
  • USA/France
  • 111 minutes
Julian Schnabel’s ravishingly tactile and luminous new film takes a fresh look at the last days of Vincent van Gogh (played by Willem Dafoe, in a shattering performance) and in the process revivifies our sense of the artist as a living, feeling human being.

3 Faces

  • Jafar Panahi
  • 2018
  • Iran
  • 100 minutes
In Iranian director Jafar Panahi’s fourth completed feature since he was officially banned from filmmaking, a young woman appears to take her own life on cell-phone camera. The recipient of the video and Panahi, playing himself, investigate, and from there, 3 Faces builds in narrative, thematic, and visual intricacy.

Asako I & II

  • Ryûsuke Hamaguchi
  • 2018
  • Japan/France
  • 119 minutes
Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, who gained attention for 2015’s Happy Hour, has returned with a beguiling and truly original Vertigo riff that traces the trajectory of a love—or, to be accurate, two loves—found, lost, displaced, and regained.

Ash Is Purest White

  • Jia Zhangke
  • 2018
  • China
  • 136 minutes
Jia Zhangke’s extraordinary gangster melodrama begins by following Qiao (a never better Zhao Tao) and her mobster boyfriend Bin as they stake out their turf against rivals and upstarts in 2001 Datong before expanding out into an epic, three-part narrative of how abstract forces shape individual lives.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

  • Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 128 minutes
Here’s something new from the Coen Brothers—a wildly entertaining anthology of short films based on a fictional book of “western tales”—starring Tim Blake Nelson, James Franco, Liam Neeson, Tom Waits, Zoe Kazan, Tyne Daly, Brendan Gleeson, and others—unified by the thematic thread of mortality.

Burning

  • Lee Chang-dong
  • 2018
  • South Korea
  • 148 minutes
Korean master Lee Chang-dong’s expansion of Haruki Murakami’s short story “Barn Burning” is a love triangle (linked by rising star Steven Yeun) and a tense, haunting multiple-character study that bends the contours of the thriller genre to brilliant effect.

Cold War

  • Pawel Pawlikowski
  • 2018
  • Poland
  • 90 minutes
Academy Award–winner Paweł Pawlikowski follows up his box-office sensation Ida with this bittersweet, exquisitely crafted tale of a tempestuous love between a pianist and a singer as they navigate the realities of living in both Poland and Paris, in and outside of the Iron Curtain.

A Faithful Man

  • Louis Garrel
  • 2018
  • France
  • 75 minutes
Co-written with the legendary Jean-Claude Carrière, the sophomore feature from actor-director Louis Garrel is at once a beguiling bedroom farce and a slippery inquiry into truth, subjectivity, and the elusive nature of romantic attraction.

A Family Tour

  • Ying Liang
  • 2018
  • Taiwan/Hong Kong/Singapore/Malaysia
  • 107 minutes
Exiled Chinese director Ying Liang’s return to feature filmmaking is a characteristically precise drama following a Hong Kong–exiled director (Gong Zhe) as she travels to a film festival in Taiwan with her husband and toddler and must avoid attracting attention. It’s a powerful work of autobiography and an empathetic snapshot of a mother-daughter relationship.

La Flor

  • Mariano Llinás
  • 2018
  • Argentina
  • 807 minutes
A decade in the making, Argentinian filmmaker Mariano Llinás’s La Flor is a labor of love and madness that redefines the concept of binge viewing, shape-shifting from a B-movie to a musical to a spy thriller to a category-defying metafiction to a remake of a very well-known French classic and, finally, to an enigmatic period piece.

Grass

  • Hong Sangsoo
  • 2018
  • South Korea
  • 66 minutes
Sitting in a café, typing on a laptop, Areum (Kim Min-hee) eavesdrops on three dramatic situations unfolding in her general vicinity. These create the narrative structure of Korean master Hong Sangsoo’s complexly episodic, deceptively simple film, which is filled raw emotions.

Happy as Lazzaro

  • Alice Rohrwacher
  • 2018
  • Italy
  • 128 minutes
A throng of tobacco farmers working on an estate live in a state of extreme deprivation, but nothing is what it seems in Alice Rohrwacher’s transfiguring and transfixing fable, which touches on perennial class struggle and enters the realm of parable.

Her Smell

  • Alex Ross Perry
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 134 minutes
In a powerhouse performance, Elisabeth Moss is Becky Something, the influential lead singer of a popular ’90s alt-rock outfit spiraling out of control as she struggles with her demons. The latest from Alex Ross Perry tracks Becky’s self-destruction—and potential creative redemption.

High Life

  • Claire Denis
  • 2018
  • Germany/France/USA/UK/Poland
  • 110 minutes
Claire Denis’s latest film—which features some of the most unsettling passages Denis has ever filmed, as well as moments of the greatest delicacy and tenderness—is set aboard a spacecraft piloted by death row prisoners on a decades-long suicide mission to enter and harness the power of a black hole.

Hotel by the River

  • Hong Sangsoo
  • 2018
  • South Korea
  • 96 minutes
Two tales overlap and intersect at a riverside hotel in Hong Sangsoo’s affecting examination of family, mortality, and the ways in which we attempt to heal wounds old and fresh.

If Beale Street Could Talk

  • Barry Jenkins
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 117 minutes
Barry Jenkins’s follow-up to his Oscar-winning Moonlight is a carefully wrought adaptation of James Baldwin’s penultimate novel, set in Harlem in the early 1970s. Jenkins’s deeply soulful film stays focused on the emotional currents between parents and children, couples and friends.

The Image Book

  • Jean-Luc Godard
  • 2018
  • Switzerland
  • 90 minutes
With Jean-Luc Godard’s The Image Book, all barriers between the artist, his art, and his audience have dissolved. Predominantly comprised of pre-existing images, many of which will be familiar from Godard’s previous work, this is a film in which the relationship between image and sound is, as always, intensely physical and sometimes jaw-dropping.

In My Room

  • Ulrich Köhler
  • 2018
  • Germany
  • 119 minutes
Sad-sack, 40ish TV cameraman Armin awakens one morning to find the world around him entirely depopulated. Ulrich Köhler takes a disarmingly realistic and restrained approach to a fantastical premise: the eternally popular fantasy of the last man on earth.

Long Day’s Journey Into Night

  • Bi Gan
  • 2018
  • China/France
  • 133 minutes
This noir-tinged film about a solitary man haunted by loss and regret is told in two parts: the first an achronological mosaic, the second a nocturnal dream. Bi Gan has created a film like nothing you’ve seen before, especially in the second half’s hour-long, gravity-defying 3D sequence shot.

Monrovia, Indiana

  • Frederick Wiseman
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 143 minutes
Every new film from Frederick Wiseman, now 88 years old, seems more vigorous and acute than the last. In this tough, piercing look at the rhythm and texture of life as it is lived in a wide swathe of this country, he documents a small town located deep in the American heartland.

Non-Fiction

  • Olivier Assayas
  • 2018
  • France
  • 106 minutes
Set within the world of publishing, Olivier Assayas’s new film finds two hopelessly intertwined couples—including Guillaume Canet’s troubled book executive and Juliette Binoche’s weary actress—obsessed with the state of things, and how (or when) it will (or might) change.

Private Life

  • Tamara Jenkins
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 123 minutes
Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti are achingly real as Rachel and Richard, a middle-aged New York couple caught in the desperation, frustration, and exhaustion of trying to have a child. Tamara Jenkins’s first film in ten years is by turns hilarious and harrowing.

RAY & LIZ

  • Richard Billingham
  • 2018
  • UK
  • 107 minutes
Not a second of this electrifying debut doesn’t feel 100% rooted in personal experience. English photographer and visual artist Richard Billingham’s film is grounded in the visual and emotional textures of his family portraits, particularly those of his deeply dysfunctional parents.

Shoplifters

  • Hirokazu Kore-eda
  • 2018
  • Japan
  • 121 minutes
Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Cannes Palme d’Or winner is a heartrending, profoundly human portrait of a most unusual “family”: a collection of societal cast-offs united by petty crime and a fierce love for one another.

Sorry Angel

  • Christophe Honoré
  • 2018
  • France
  • 132 minutes
An intimate chronicle of a romance and a sprawling portrait of gay life in early 1990s France, Sorry Angel follows the intertwining journeys of a worldly, HIV-positive Parisian writer confronting his own mortality, and a curious, carefree university student just beginning to live.

Too Late to Die Young

  • Dominga Sotomayor
  • 2018
  • Chile/Brazil/Argentina/Netherlands/Qatar
  • 110 minutes
The troubling realities of the adult world intrude on a girl’s teenage idyll in this dreamy drift through the Chile of the early 1990s, a nostalgic and piercing portrait of a young woman—and a country—on the cusp of exhilarating and terrifying change.

Transit

  • Christian Petzold
  • 2018
  • Germany/France
  • 101 minutes
A hollowed-out European refugee who has escaped from two concentration camps, arrives in Marseille assuming the identity of a dead novelist whose papers he is carrying in Christian Petzold’s brilliant and haunting film.

Wildlife

  • Paul Dano
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 104 minutes
In first-time director Paul Dano’s impressive debut, a carefully wrought adaptation of Richard Ford’s 1990 novel (co-written by Zoe Kazan), a family comes apart one loosely stitched seam at a time. Jake Gyllenhaal and Carey Mulligan star as the parents; Ed Oxenbould is the adolescent son trying to hold the center.

Spotlight on Documentary

This year’s series of dispatches from the front lines of nonfiction cinema features intimate portraits of artists, depictions of the quest for political and social justice, and much more.

American Dharma

  • Errol Morris
  • 2018
  • USA/UK
  • 100 minutes
Errol Morris faces off with none other than Steve Bannon—former Goldman Sachs partner and movie executive, self-proclaimed “populist” warrior, and long-time cinephile—in this unflinching film.

Angels are Made of Light

  • James Longley
  • 2018
  • USA/Denmark/Norway
  • 117 minutes
School children grow up before our eyes into young adults in the shattered city of Kabul in the meticulously constructed new film from James Longley (Iraq in Fragments).

Carmine Street Guitars

  • Ron Mann
  • 2018
  • Canada
  • 80 minutes
Ron Mann’s Carmine Street Guitars is a lovely portrait of a week in the life of luthier Rick Kelly’s eponymous ground floor shop.

The Cold Blue

  • Erik Nelson
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 73 minutes
Built primarily from color 16mm images shot in the spring of 1943 by director William Wyler and his crew on 8th Air Force bombing raids over Germany and strategic locations in occupied France, The Cold Blue is filtered through the spoken recollections of nine veterans.

Divide and Conquer: The Story of Roger Ailes

  • Alexis Bloom
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 107 minutes
Alexis Bloom’s scrupulous, methodically mounted documentary concerns Roger Ailes, the hemophiliac boy from Warren, Ohio, who worked his way up from television production to the Nixon White House to stewardship of the full-fledged right-wing propaganda machine Fox News.

Dream of a City

  • Manfred Kirchheimer
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 39 minutes
87-year old Manny Kirchheimer’s astonishing Dream of a City is comprised of stunning black and white 16mm images of the city from 1958 to 1960.

End of Life

  • John Bruce, Pawel Wojtasik
  • 2017
  • USA/Greece
  • 91 minutes
Bruce and Wojtasik are tuned to a very special and extraordinarily delicate wavelength as artists, and their radiant film takes a respectful and serenely composed look at the very activity, the actual work, of dying for five individuals.

Fire Music

  • Tom Surgal
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 71 minutes
Tom Surgal’s film looks at the astonishing sounds (and sights) of that combustible and wildly diverse moment in music known as free jazz; it’s a fittingly wild and freeform tribute to music that makes your hair stand on end.

Maria by Callas

  • Tom Volf
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 113 minutes
Tom Volf’s film about Maria Callas, one of the supreme artists and cultural stars of the mid-20th century, is a cinematic love note to a great artist, and a vivid audiovisual document of mid-century western culture.

The Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress

  • William Wyler
  • 1944
  • USA
  • 45 minutes
Major William Wyler’s Memphis Belle, shot on 16mm from a B-17 bomber, is one of the greatest of the WWII combat documentaries, and it has now been meticulously and painstakingly restored.

The Times of Bill Cunningham

  • Mark Bozek
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 74 minutes
Working with precious material, including a lengthy 1994 filmed interview with Cunningham and his subject’s earliest pre-New York Times photographs, Mark Bozek’s takes us on a lovely and invigorating journey into the world of the now legendary street photographer.

The Waldheim Waltz

  • Ruth Beckermann
  • 2018
  • Austria
  • 93 minutes
Ruth Beckermann exclusively uses archival footage to study how various media reported the events surrounding former Austrian president Kurt Waldheim’s political accession despite a controversy over his role in the Nazi regime during World War II.

Watergate

  • Charles Ferguson
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 260 minutes
Charles Ferguson reopens the case of Watergate, from the 1972 break-in to Nixon’s 1974 resignation and beyond, and gives it a new and bracing life, also drawing disquieting fact-based parallels with another presidency and criminal investigation, still underway.

What You Gonna Do When the World’s on Fire?

  • Roberto Minervini
  • 2018
  • Italy/USA/France
  • 123 minutes
Shot in very sharp black and white, Minervini’s follow-up to his Texas Trilogy is a portrait of African-Americans in New Orleans struggling to maintain their unique cultural identity and to find social justice.

Special Events

The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

  • Rex Ingram
  • 1921
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 132 minutes
Rex Ingram’s monumental antiwar film is a devastating tale about a divided Argentine family fighting on opposite sides during World War I. Featuring the North American premiere of a new score composed and performed by Matthew Nolan, Seán Mac Erlaine, Adrian Crowley, Kevin Murphy, and Barry Adamson.

The Other Side of the Wind

  • Orson Welles
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 122 minutes
Almost 50 years after Orson Welles started shooting, The Other Side of the Wind, starring Welles as Jake Hannaford, an old-guard macho Hollywood director at the end of his tether, has finally been completed by Welles’s collaborators.

They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead

  • Morgan Neville
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 98 minutes
Morgan Neville’s documentary proves that the story of the making of Orson Welles’s The Other Side of the Wind is as engrossing and rich in character and incident, and perhaps even more epic in scale, than the film itself.

Film Comment Presents

Border

  • Ali Abbasi
  • 2018
  • Sweden/Denmark
  • 108 minutes
Scandinavian mythology makes for a visceral fantastical drama on the mystery of identity in this adaptation of a story by Let the Right One In writer John Ajvide Lindqvist, about a troll-like customs inspector, Tina, who possesses the ability to sniff out contraband and moral corruption

The Wild Pear Tree

  • Nuri Bilge Ceylan
  • 2018
  • Turkey
  • 188 minutes
Against the gorgeous backdrop of rolling country and idyllic farmland, Turkish auteur Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Once Upon a Time in Anatolia) captures the wrenching struggles of a bright literary graduate trying to take flight in a world he can’t entirely accept.

Projections

Projections presents an international selection of film and video work that expands upon our notions of what the moving image can do and be. Drawing on a broad range of innovative modes and techniques, including experimental narratives, avant-garde poetics, crossovers into documentary realms, and contemporary art practices, Projections brings together a diverse offering of short, medium, and feature-length work by some of today’s most essential and groundbreaking filmmakers and artists.

Projections is curated by Dennis Lim (FSLC Director of Programming) and Aily Nash (independent curator). Shelby Shaw and Dan Sullivan are Program Assistants. Projections is sponsored by MUBI.

Purchase an All Access Pass for Projections for $125 here.

Diamantino

  • Daniel Schmidt and Gabriel Abrantes
  • 2018
  • Portugal/France/Brazil
  • 92 minutes
This dazzlingly original feature from longtime collaborators Daniel Schmidt and Gabriel Abrantes about a chiseled fútbol star who flees the public eye is a perversely pleasurable sendup of Brexit, genetic science, and the ongoing refugee crises.

11 x 14

  • James Benning
  • 1977
  • USA
  • 35mm
  • 82 minutes
Composed of 65 beautifully framed shots of provincial life and suburban domesticity, Benning’s 16mm-shot travelogue of the Midwestern United States advanced notions of structuralist cinema while forming a visual tapestry of the American heartland in all its rugged glory.

Classical Period

  • Ted Fendt
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 16mm
  • 62 minutes
A group of young intellectuals partake in playful rounds of academic sparring in Fendt’s second feature, an über-cinephilic treatise on language, literature, and theology.

The Grand Bizarre

  • Jodie Mack
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 16mm
  • 61 minutes
American animator Jodie Mack’s first feature is a color-coordinated, rhythmically tuned fantasia for the senses. Filmed over five years and in as many countries, this all-analog travelogue finds thousands of textiles and printed designs dancing across locations from Mexico to Morocco to India.

Roi Soleil

  • Albert Serra
  • 2018
  • Spain/Portugal
  • 62 minutes
Albert Serra’s follow-up to his magisterial The Death of Louis XIV is another forensic documentation of the Sun King’s final breaths. Featuring Lluís Serrat in a filmed performance of a 2017 installation, Roi Soleil boldly crossbreeds performance art and observational cinema.

Second Time Around

  • Dora García
  • 2018
  • Belgium/Norway
  • 94 minutes
García’s first feature explores the intersection of politics, psychoanalysis, and performance, nimbly interweaving narrative and nonfiction devices to arrive at something wholly distinct from either.

Your Face

  • Tsai Ming-liang
  • 2018
  • Taiwan
  • 76 minutes
Comprised of a series of portrait shots of mostly anonymous individuals, Tsai Ming-liang’s latest digital experiment shrewdly deemphasizes language while reducing context to a bare minimum, and features a soundtrack by Ryuichi Sakamoto.

Ericka Beckman Program

  • Ericka Beckman
  • 1983/1986
  • 16mm
  • 58 minutes
Whimsically examining issues of self-image, gender, and female sexuality, Beckman’s surrealist odysseys employ universal narrative threads as allegorical building blocks for ambitiously staged productions

Quantification Trilogy

  • Jeremy Shaw
  • 111 minutes
Shaw’s vérité-style trilogy imagines a dystopian—and increasingly familiar—social order in which marginalized societies strive against extinction.

Program 1: Place Revisited

  • Various
  • 2018
  • 61 minutes
This program features A Return by James Edmonds, Valeria Street by Janie Geiser, Mahogany Too by Akosua Adoma Owusu, Between Relating and Use by Nazli Dinçel, Trees Down Here by Ben Rivers, Eye of a Needle by Katherin McInnis, and Wishing Well by Sylvia Schedelbauer.

Program 2: Strategies for Renewal

  • Various
  • 2018
  • 63 minutes
This program features Key, washer, coin by Alan Segal, Words, Planets by Laida Lertxundi, Life After Love by Zachary Epcar, I Hope I'm Loud When I'm Dead by Beatrice Gibson, and The Air of the Earth in Your Lungs by Ross Meckfessel.

Program 3: Trips to the Interior

  • Various
  • 2018
  • 67 minutes
This program features Fainting Spells by Sky Hopinka, Chooka by Parastoo Anoushahpour, Faraz Anoushahpour, and Ryan Ferko, Ada Kaleh by Helena Wittmann, and The Labyrinth by Laura Huertas Millán.

Program 4: Form and Function

  • Various
  • 2018
  • 60 minutes
This program features Mixed Signals by Courtney Stephens, Luminous Shadow by Mariana Caló and Francisco Queimadela, The Glass Note by Mary Helena Clark, and Walled Unwalled by Lawrence Abu Hamdan.

Program 5: Persistent Analogues

  • Various
  • 2017/8
  • 75 minutes
This program features Kodak by Andrew Norman Wilson and What Weakens the Flesh Is the Flesh Itself by Steve Reinke and James Richards.

From Its Mouth Came a River of High-End Residential Appliances

  • Jon Wang
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 13 minutes
Hundreds of feet in the air, a drone approaches a row of skyscrapers along Hong Kong’s affluent southern coast. The target: giant holes in the buildings’ facades kept clear for the passage of mythological dragons.

Gropius Memory Palace

  • Ben Thorp Brown
  • 2017
  • USA
  • 20 minutes
Part architectural film, part ASMR exercise, this observational study of Walter Gropius's famed shoe warehouse, The Fagus Factory, is a meditation in every sense.

Revivals

The Revivals section showcases important works from renowned filmmakers that have been digitally remastered, restored, and preserved with the assistance of generous partners.

Detour

  • Edgar G. Ulmer
  • 1945
  • USA
  • 68 minutes
Edgar G. Ulmer’s 1945 Poverty Row classic turned its cheapness into an aesthetic asset and created a film experience that reeks of sweat, rust, and mildew; it has come to be regarded as the essence of film noir.

Enamorada

  • Emilio Fernández
  • 1946
  • Mexico
  • 99 minutes
One of the most popular Mexican films ever made, this wildly passionate and visually beautiful love story follows the romance between between a revolutionary General (Pedro Armendariz) and the daughter of a nobleman (Maria Félix) during the Mexican revolution.

Hyenas

  • Djibril Diop Mambéty
  • 1992
  • Senegal/Switzerland/France
  • 110 minutes
A wealthy woman returns to her home village, and offers the inhabitants a vast sum in exchange for the murder of the local man who seduced and abandoned her when she was young in Djibril Diop Mambéty’s freeform adaptation of Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s The Visit.

I Am Cuba

  • Mikhail Kalatozov
  • 1964
  • Cuba/USSR
  • 141 minutes
Mikhail Kalatozov’s wildly mobile, hallucinatory film went largely disregarded and almost unknown for nearly 30 years but is now renowned as a one-of-a-kind film experience, a visually mind-bending bolt from the historical blue.

Khrustalyov, My Car!

  • Aleksei Guerman
  • 1998
  • USSR/France
  • 150 minutes
Moscow, 1953: the Jewish purges are still on, and Stalin is on his deathbed. After trying to escape, a military surgeon is abducted and deposited at the heart of the enigma. Alexei Guerman’s deeply personal film is a work of solid and constant disorientation, masterfully orchestrated.

Neapolitan Carousel

  • Ettore Giannini
  • 1954
  • Italy
  • 129 minutes
One of the first color films made in Italy, Ettore Giannini’s 1954 film version of his stage musical features an amazing roster of talent, including Ballets Russes principal dancer Léonide Massine (who also choreographed), the great comic actor Paolo Stoppa, and a young Sophia Loren.

None Shall Escape

  • André de Toth
  • 1944
  • USA
  • 85 minutes
Directed by Hungarian emigré André de Toth and written by Lester Cole, soon to become a member of the Hollywood Ten, this unflinching look at the rise of Nazism right before the end of the war was the first Hollywood film to address Nazi genocide.

The Red House

  • Delmer Daves
  • 1947
  • USA
  • 100 minutes
This moody, visually potent film, directed by Delmer Daves and independently produced by star Edward G. Robinson with Sol Lesser, is something of an anomaly in late ’40s moviemaking, a piece of contemporary gothic Americana.

Spring Night, Summer Night

  • J.L. Anderson
  • 1967
  • USA
  • 82 minutes
Made in coal-mining country in northeastern Ohio with local amateur actors, J.L. Anderson’s haunted Appalachian romance occupies a proud place alongside such similarly hand-crafted, off-the-grid American independent films as Carnival of Souls, The Exiles, Night of the Living Dead, and Wanda.

Tunes of Glory

  • Ronald Neame
  • 1960
  • UK
  • 106 minutes
Ronald Neame’s adaptation of James Kennaway’s novel is a spare, dramatically potent war of nerves, about the power struggle between a tough lower-middle-class Scottish Major (Alec Guinness) and an aristocratic Colonel (John Mills) traumatized by captivity during the war.

The War at Home

  • Glenn Silber
  • 1979
  • USA
  • 100 minutes
Using carefully assembled archival and news footage and thoughtful interviews, this meticulously constructed film recounts the development of the movement against the American war in Vietnam on the Madison campus of the University of Wisconsin, from 1963 to 1970.

Retrospective

Tribute to Dan Talbot

Before the Revolution

  • Bernardo Bertolucci
  • 1964
  • Italy
  • 105 minutes
Bernardo Bertolucci’s masterful second feature is a deeply personal portrait of a generation gripped by political uncertainty set in the director’s hometown of Parma.

Straub-Huillet Program

  • Jean-Marie Straub, Danièle Huillet
  • West Germany
  • 96 minutes
These three films by Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, often shown together, are among their very best, daring short films based on works by Heinrich Böll and Ferdinand Bruckner.

The Ceremony

  • Nagisa Oshima
  • 1971
  • Japan
  • 123 minutes
Oshima’s disarmingly atmospheric portrait of a family’s collective psychopathology recounts the saga of the Sakurada clan, whose decline plays out over the course of 25 years and multiple funerals and weddings.

Every Man for Himself

  • Jean-Luc Godard
  • 1980
  • France/Austria/West Germany/Switzerland
  • 87 minutes
What Godard called his “second first film” is a moving portrait of restless, intertwining lives, and the myriad forms of self-debasement and survival in a capitalist state, with Jacques Dutronc, Nathalie Baye, Isabelle Huppert, and, in an unforgettable anti-cameo, the voice of Marguerite Duras.

The American Friend

  • Wim Wenders
  • 1977
  • West Germany/France
  • 125 minutes
Dennis Hopper is the sociopathic charmer Tom Ripley, transformed by Wenders into an urban cowboy peddler of forged paintings who ensnares Bruno Ganz’s gravely ill Swiss-born art framer into a plot to assassinate a Mafioso. This brooding, dreamlike thriller conjures a world ruled by chaos.

The Marriage of Maria Braun

  • Rainer Werner Fassbinder
  • 1979
  • West Germany
  • 120 minutes
This 1979 film about a poor German soldier’s wife (Hanna Schygulla) who uses her wiles and savvy to rise as a businesswoman and take part in the “wirtschaftwunder” or postwar economic miracle, became Fassbinder’s first art-house hit.

My Dinner with André

  • Louis Malle
  • 1981
  • USA
  • 110 minutes
This encounter between two writers playing themselves discussing mortality, money, despair, and love over a meal at an upper west side restaurant was an art-house sensation, playing to packed houses for a solid year.

Tribute to Pierre Rissient

Manila in the Claws of Light

  • Lino Brocka
  • 1975
  • Phillipines
  • 124 minutes
As Todd McCarthy wrote, it was Pierre who “single-handedly brought the work of the late Filipino director Lino Brocka to the world’s attention.” This searing melodrama, with Bembel Roco and Hilda Koronel as doomed lovers, is one of Brocka’s greatest.

A Touch of Zen

  • King Hu
  • 1971/75
  • Hong Kong
  • 200 minutes
Supreme fantasist, Ming dynasty scholar, and incomparable artist, King Hu elevated the martial-arts genre to unparalleled heights; three years in the making, this was his greatest film.

Time Without Pity

  • Joseph Losey
  • 1957
  • UK
  • 85 minutes
In this consummately tense noir, one of Joseph Losey’s greatest films, a recovering alcoholic (Michael Redgrave) has a mere 24 hours to prove the innocence of his son, accused of murdering his girlfriend.

Play Misty for Me

  • Clint Eastwood
  • 1971
  • USA
  • 102 minutes
Clint Eastwood’s first film, about a casual romantic encounter between a Northern California DJ (played by the director) and a woman named Evelyn (Jessica Walter) that turns harrowingly obsessive, is an essential film from an essential moment in cinema known as Hollywood in the ’70s.

Mother India

  • Mehboob Khan
  • 1957
  • India
  • 172 minutes
This seminal Bollywood film is about the trials and tribulations of a poor villager caught in the historic whirlwind of the struggles endured in her country after gaining its independence from Britain.

House by the River

  • Fritz Lang
  • 1950
  • USA
  • 89 minutes
There were few filmmakers whose work Pierre Rissient revered more than Fritz Lang, whom he counted among his friends, and this wild gothic period melodrama, made at Republic Pictures, starring Louis Hayward and Jane Wyatt, was one of his favorites.

The Man I Love

  • Raoul Walsh
  • 1947
  • USA
  • 96 minutes
This 1947 film, somewhere between noir, musical, and melodrama, is one of Raoul Walsh’s least recognized and most moving, with Ida Lupino as a Manhattan lounge singer who heads to Los Angeles to live with her family and start a new life.

Three Documentaries on Cinema

Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché

  • Pamela B. Green
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 103 minutes
This energetic documentary tells the story of Alice Guy-Blaché, a true pioneer who got into the movie business in 1894, at the age of 21 before becoming head of production at Gaumont and directing films. Narration by Jodie Foster.

Introduzione all’Oscuro

  • Gastón Solnicki
  • 2018
  • Argentina/Austria
  • 71 minutes
Gastón Solnicki (Kékszakállú, NYFF54) pays tribute to his great friend Hans Hurch, one-time film critic and assistant to Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, in this moving communion with a friend whose presence is felt in the memory of the places, the people, the coffee, and the films he loved.

Searching for Ingmar Bergman

  • Margarethe von Trotta
  • 2018
  • Germany/France
  • 99 minutes
On the occasion of Ingmar Bergman’s centenary comes this lovely, personal film from one of his greatest admirers, Margarethe von Trotta, a tribute from an artist with such a deep affinity for the subject.

Shorts

International Shorts Program I

  • Various
  • 72 minutes
This program features Yalda Afsah's Tourner, Martin DiCicco's Here There Is No Earth, Hu Bo's Man in the Well, Laura Huertas Millán's jeny303, João Vladimiro's Anteu.

International Shorts Program II

  • Various
  • 77 minutes
This program features Sofia Bohdanowicz's Veslemøy’s Song, Nicolás Zukerfeld's Let Us Now Praise Movies, Benjamin Crotty's Glorious Acceptance of Nicolas Chauvin, Joshua Tuthill's Black Dog, and Zhengfan Yang's Down There.

Genre Stories

  • Various
  • 85 minutes
This program features Just Philippot's Acid, Nicole Perlman's The Slows, Danny Lee's Toto, Phillip Montgomery's Child of the Sky, Ilja Rautsi's Helsinki Mansplaining Massacre.

New York Stories

  • Various
  • 63 minutes
This program features Eleanore Pienta's Ada, Ashley Connor & Joe Stankus's The Chore, Barbara Cigarroa's God Never Dies, Michael Almereyda's The North Wind’s Gift & To the Unknown, and Jason Giampietro's Quarterbacks.

Talks

On Cinema

Every year at the festival, we ask an invited filmmaker to select clips from work that has inspired and informed his or her own practice, as the basis for a discussion with festival director Kent Jones.

On Cinema: Claire Denis

  • 60 minutes
Kent Jones will talk with French filmmaker Claire Denis, whose completely unexpected science-fiction film High Life, starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche, is sure to be one of the most talked-about selections of the festival.

Directors Dialogues

In this annual series of intimate conversations, a selection of filmmakers from this year’s festival sit down for special Q&As to discuss their craft.

Directors Dialogues: Alfonso Cuarón

  • 60 minutes
The Oscar-winning director of Y tu mamá también, Children of Men, and Gravity will discuss his latest and most personal work, ROMA, an intimate yet monumental vision, and one of his very best films.

Directors Dialogues: Alice Rohrwacher

  • 60 minutes
Rohrwacher was Film Society of Lincoln Center's Artist in Residence in 2016, during which time she worked on the script that became the Cannes-awarded drama Happy as Lazzaro, showing in this year's Main Slate. Join Rohrwacher as she talks about her process bringing this unique vision to the screen.

Directors Dialogues: Errol Morris

  • 60 minutes
The legendary documentarian (The Thin Blue Line, The Fog of War) has no problem with confronting and interrogating people in positions of power. Sit down with him as he talks about his experience sitting down the subject of his latest film, American Dharma: Steve Bannon.

Directors Dialogues: Jia Zhangke

  • 60 minutes
Jia has gradually moved to the forefront of Chinese cinema, and his films constitute a constant reckoning with his country's transformations. His latest, the epic gangster drama Ash Is Purest White, is no exception.

Directors Dialogues: Mariano Llinás

  • 60 minutes
Mariano Llinás discusses the vision and process behind his singular, wildly inventive epic La Flor, which skips across a multitude of genres over the course of its fourteen hours.

NYFF

Free talks hosted daily at 7pm from September 29-October 10 at the EBM Amphitheater.

Film Comment Live: The Cinema of Experience

  • 60 minutes
At this year’s NYFF, filmmakers are rising to the challenge of representing diverse experiences at a pivotal time in our nation’s history. For our 2018 Cinema of Experience talk, we will discuss Asian and Asian American experience on and off screen, and in film criticism.

Film Comment Live: Filmmakers Chat

  • 60 minutes
For the third year, Film Comment gives you the rare chance to see some of today’s most important filmmakers in dialogue with each other.

Film Comment Live: Festival Wrap

  • 60 minutes
In what is becoming an annual tradition, Film Comment contributing critics and editors gather for the festival’s final week and have a spirited discussion about the movies they’ve seen in the lineup, from the Main Slate and beyond.

Convergence

The seventh edition of the annual program delves into innovative modes of storytelling via interactive experiences, featuring Virtual Reality, Immersive Cinema, AI, and more.

All VR projects take place in the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater and the Rose Studio (CMS, 10th Floor Rose Building).

What Goes Up/Must Come Down

  • Eline Jongsma, Kel O’Neill
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 10 minutes
Ingeniously weaving virtual reality and conventional 2D filmmaking, Jongsma and O'Neill fuse two discrete documentaries about the Pingxi Sky Lantern Festival into a singular whole, and suggest that our dreams may have staggering, real-world consequences.

Fire Escape

  • Navid Khonsari
  • 2018
  • USA
  • 45 minutes
This cutting-edge adventure from inkStories (Hero and 1979 Revolution), shown for the first time in its entirety, blurs the lines between game, film, and episodic storytelling, all while creating something entirely new.

Virtual Reality Documentary Program

  • Various
  • 2017/8
  • 70 minutes
This program features the Lupita Nyong'o-narrated My Africa, Ana Kler's The Drummer, and the world premiere of the Mumbai-set Hope Amongst the Haze.

Virtual Reality Arcade

  • Various
  • 70 minutes
Featuring new projects from Walt Disney Animation Studios and more, the VR Arcade gives participants the opportunity to experience several VR stories from multiple creators in the same space.

Frankenstein AI: A Monster Made by Many

  • 120 minutes
It was an innocuous challenge, issued by Lord Byron 200 years ago, that sparked Mary Shelley’s imagination to bring Frankenstein to life. Join Columbia University School of the Arts' Digital Storytelling Lab as they bring this spark to NYFF Convergence with a special lab session mixing story, play, design, and AI.